By: allwanttoknow.com

Freepik

Risk Factors of Breast Cancer in Men 

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Male breast cancer is more likely to develop in older men than younger males. As a guy gets older, his chance of breast cancer increases. Men with breast cancer are often diagnosed when they are 72 years old on average.

01

Aging

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If other family members (blood relatives) have experienced breast cancer, the risk of developing the disease is enhanced. One in five males with breast cancer have a close family who also has the condition, whether they are male or female.

02

Family History

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With a lifetime risk of roughly 6 in 100, men who have a mutation (defect) in the BRCA2 gene are more likely to develop breast cancer. Men can also develop breast cancer from BRCA1 mutations.

03

Gene Mutations

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Infertility is common in men with Klinefelter syndrome, who also have tiny testicles. Compared to other men, these guys are more likely to develop breast cancer.  

04

Klinefelter Syndrome

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A man has a higher risk of acquiring breast cancer if his chest has undergone radiation therapy (for instance, as part of treatment for a chest cancer like lymphoma).

05

Radiation Exposure

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Men who drink heavily (of alcoholic beverages) have an increased risk of developing breast cancer. This might be as a result of how it affects the liver.

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Alcohol

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In addition to an increased risk of breast cancer, men with liver disease also run the risk of developing gynecomastia, a benign male breast development.

07

Bad Liver

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Additionally, male breast cancer is at risk due to obesity. The body's fat cells transform male hormones (androgens) into female hormones (estrogens), which is the cause.

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Obesity

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Male breast cancer risk may be increased by a number of factors, including undescended testicles, adult mumps, and testicular removal surgery (orchiectomy).

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Testicular Health